Landfill gas capture

The trash we bury in landfills decomposes slowly, producing methane which escapes into the atmosphere. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas – about 21 times as powerful as carbon dioxide – so projects which capture and destroy that gas are of great benefit to the climate. These projects capture the methane from landfills using wells, pipes, blowers and other technology; and destroy the gas by burning it in a flare, or by generating electricity, or by sending purified gas to industrial end-users for process heat.

Tri-Community Landfill

Landfill gas capture
The Tri-Community Landfill is a small community landfill located just south of the Canadian border.

L.P. Gill Landfill

Landfill gas capture
The L.P. Gill Landfill is an award winning project that has been a leader in the methane gas capture field.

Worcester County Landfill

Landfill gas capture
Worcester County Landfill is working to reduce their emissions now and has implemented a system that prepares them to take advantage of future technology.

Sioux Falls Regional Sanitary Landfill

Landfill gas capture
Sioux Fall Regional Sanitary Landfill is a forward looking landfill that is protecting the environment today and implement systems that can be expanded in the future.

Robeson County Landfill

Landfill gas capture
The landfill gas collection system was designed so that it can collect methane gas in its active cells. This means that emissions are reduced during waste collection.

Greenville County Landfill

Landfill gas capture
The Greenville County Landfill is a past winner of the EPA’s Landfill Methane Outreach Program’s “Project of the Year” award.

Crow Wing County Landfill

Landfill gas capture
Located in Brainerd, Minnesota, the Crow Wing County Landfill is a small county-owned facility run by Marvin Stroschein and his family.

Greater Lebanon Refuse Authority

Landfill gas capture
In 2007 GLRA won an award from the EPA for turning their landfill into a community asset and reducing green house gases.

Flathead County Landfill Gas-to-Energy

Landfill gas capture
This landfill, near Glacier National Park, is the first landfill gas-to-energy project in Montana, and provides renewable power in a state that runs primarily on coal.

Dorchester County New Beulah Landfill

Landfill gas capture
Carbon offsets are currently the only source of revenue for the operation of this project because the quantity of landfill gas available is too small to enable investment in electricity generators.