Adjust your computer’s power settings to save energy

If you’re not going to use your computer for more than 20 minutes, turn off just the monitor. If your computer will stand idle for more than 2 hours, turn both it and the monitor off. Ensuring your computer is powered down, either manually with a power strip or by setting your computer’s power management features, saves money and cuts your greenhouse gas emissions.

**How this helps**

Powering computers requires a substantial amount of energy. Yet most computers are only used a fraction of the time they are on. Adjusting your computer’s power settings to save energy means the computer and monitor will switch into sleep mode when standing idle. This energy saving change will cut your computer’s electricity use by up to 80 percent and put $25 to $75 in yearly power costs back in your pocket.

Read this tip in full at GreenYour.com.

**More information**

* Energy Star: how to save $25 to $75 annually through power management
* UC Berkeley’s guide to power management in PCs and monitors

**Related tips**

* Recycle old computers, or donate them to charity
* Use a smart power strip
* Make sure your next computer is an Energy Star computer

This tip is reproduced with permission from GreenYour.com.

Author Bio

greenyour

Comments Disabled

  1. Matt Ward - October 8, 2008

    Hi! For power management I use the Edison software from Verdiem. It provides a really really easy to use all in one interface that saves you having to mess around in the control panel. I highly recommend it. (I am not affiliated with the software of company in any way!).
    Matt.

  2. Matt Ward - October 8, 2008

    Hi! For power management I use the Edison software from Verdiem. It provides a really really easy to use all in one interface that saves you having to mess around in the control panel. I highly recommend it. (I am not affiliated with the software of company in any way!). Oh yeah – its FREE!
    Matt.

  3. mateo - October 8, 2008

    useful tip! even more significant savings can be achieved when doing this as a team in the workplace. if you have a workstation shared with 3 other people, a powerstrip that shuts off the power for the 4 computers, monitors, printers, etc. can kill a lot of watts. last one to leave, pull the switch!

  4. Curious - October 8, 2008

    What about using Blackle as a home page? Does that save energy?

  5. PCgeek - October 8, 2008

    curious, actually blackle is a scam! using a black background screen only saves energy when you are using CRT monitors. more than 90% of monitors now are LCD and the same amount of energy is consumed by the screen regardless of the color being displayed.

  6. GetCaughtDead - October 8, 2008

    I’ve always been told it’s bad practice to shut off a computer by simply cutting the power, i.e. via power strip or pulling the plug. Windows seems to validate this claim by reminding me when it didn’t shut down properly and has to scan the drive for errors. Is this not really the case?

  7. Chad - October 8, 2008

    Keep sure to shut your computer down via Windows before you unplug it. Almost every instance I have encountered of fried drives, chips, etc has occured due to hard reboots after lockups or after power failures.
    Getting a Smart Strip that slaves all of your accessories (router, printer, monitor) to the master computer outlet can save you a few watts.
    Unfortunately, I can’t turn my computer off anymore, because the power switch is broken. Turning it back on usually entails taking off the cover, prodding with a screwdriver, and lots of swearing.

  8. Sandy - October 11, 2008

    Well, i always put my computer on stand by, even when it is just 20 mins that i am gonna be away.

  9. Debbie - October 11, 2008

    What if you have Voisp/Vonage. Doesn’t the router have to be on to recieve phone calls?

  10. Walter Boyer - October 15, 2008

    I used some of your links and navigated to
    http://eetd.lbl.gov/ The information is PERHAPS useful for BIOS settings. But the pages keep referring to Windows 3.1 and Win NT systems. That’s a real shocker, that the PC info is from 1992! and maybe 1998.
    Ten years in the computer world is like 40 years in the real world. Most of us can’t remember how bad the Power Management was – “40 years” ago!
    Additionally, XP improved it alot and many Vista PC’s use “Hibernate” better than XP could ever dream about. That was the information I expected to see.

  11. Multifunction Printers - July 1, 2009

    This was my first visit to your blog and the tip are very useful ! even more significant savings can be achieved when doing this as a team in the workplace. if you have aworkstation shared with 3 other peoples.

  12. Anonymous - August 3, 2009

    Powering computers requires a substantial amount of energy. Yet most computers are only used a fraction of the time they are on

Facebook

Get the Facebook Likebox Slider Pro for WordPress